Courses

Liturgical Studies

Students are required to sing/chant various pieces associated with the liturgies of Holy Week and the Great Fifty Days of Easter. They will be trained in how to “point” the psalms and the Gospels and will be required to demonstrate their acquired skills. Emphasis is placed on understanding the theology and logistics of these liturgies as well as performing them. 1.0 credit
Basics of liturgical movement, practice, dress, and leading daily officers. 1.0 credit
Exploration of resources and practice creating and conducting liturgies in ministry situations outside the church. 1.0 credit
A practicum for the deacons’ role in the Eucharistic Liturgy. Students participate, with the instructor, to master the basics of doing liturgy comfortably and confidently. Second and third year students are designated as Masters of Ceremonies for the worship services of the school community and responsible for organizing liturgies as assigned. This is a critical part of liturgical competence. All students must take all three semesters of liturgical practicum. 1.0 credit
An overview of the history of liturgy in the western church, with an emphasis on Baptism, Eucharist, and the Daily Office. Reading, reflection, and class discussion will help students articulate the Church’s theology of Baptism and Eucharist; understand the shape of the Daily Office; and use the resources of the Book of Common Prayer to plan worship 1.0 credits
An introduction to the various roles of deacons in the liturgical life of the church. Through reading, practice, reflection, and class discussion, the students will explore the ministry of deacons in worship. 1.5 credits

Bible Studies

This survey course immerses the student in the Hebrew Bible [Old Testament]. The emphasis of the course in on understanding the stories and prophetic writings of the Hebrew Bible in their own time and the meaning this literature has for us in the world today. 2.0 Credits
This course introduces students to the New Testament. The parables of Jesus and the relationship of Jesus parables and Paul’s writings to law and faith are explored. 2.0 Credits
This course focuses on the contents and theology of the synoptic gospels, including the exegetical skills needed for effective diaconal preaching. 2.0 Credits
The Epistle to the Romans and the Gospel of John have probably had more impact on Christian life and thought than any other documents. This course will analyze these works in detail with special attention to their social setting, literary structure, theology and spirituality and the implications for contemporary Christianity. Instruction will be by lecture and requires two projects and three sermon outlines on preselected topics. 2.0 Credits

Ministry Development

On completion of this course the student will be able to articulate why it is important to see themselves as developers of the Church’s diaconal ministry; to connect each of seven core values to theological sources and the practice of ministry, and to use at least three new tools or practices for working with and strengthening other adults in ministry. 2.0 Credits

Church History

This two semester course introduces the student to the cultural, ritual, historical and theological influences on the developing Church from its beginnings to the present day. 2.0 Credits
This two semester course introduces the student to the cultural, ritual, historical and theological influences on the developing Church from its beginnings to the present day. 2.0 Credits

Ethics

An in-depth course that defines the Anglican ethical perspective and examines the principal social justice issues facing the church today. General topic areas include: issues related to the poor, biomedical ethics, issues related to women, sexual ethics, and professional ethics. 2.0 Credits

Pastoral Care

Deacons invariably find themselves leading groups of many kinds and sizes. The purpose of this course is to provide the student with fundamental knowledge of and skills in the dynamics of group leadership: establishing agreements, defining the task and scope, defining roles, building cohesion, managing conflict and collaborative problem solving. This brief introduction will provide the student with resources for further study and will equip the student to begin the process of effective group leadership. It includes didactic instruction, experiential learning, assigned readings, discussion and written reflection. This course is not a course in group counseling; the goal is to provide the student with skills with which to manage meetings. 1.5 Credits
The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to pastoral care, with a focus on crisis ministry. Students will be introduced to foundational knowledge and skill for pastoral care through readings, lectures, role plays, and group discussions. Drawing on models of adult learning, students will be expected to reflect on lived experience and engage in empathic and critical reflection in the class. The course will introduce concepts associated with: 1) a relationally-oriented perspective on pastoral care, informed by the Anglican tradition, 2) crisis ministry, 3) hospitalization and illness, 4) grief and loss, and 5) substance abuse, addiction and recovery. Students will be guided to apply these concepts to their practice of ministry. The course will include the formation of a group covenant, written reflections, and a "verbatim" visit. This course is intended to prepare students for Clinical Pastoral Education and other educational experiences focused on the development of one’s ministry practice. 2.0 Credits
The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to those fundamental skills which will enable the student to listen attentively and compassionately to the intent as well as the content of what others are saying. Techniques such as paraphrasing, clarifying, labeling, inquiring, providing feedback and effective confrontation will be presented to and practiced by the class. The course will include a group covenant, experiential learning, didactic sessions, assigned readings, discussion and written reflections. This course introduces concepts and skills which the student will develop further in Clinical Pastoral Education. 1.5 Credits

Field Education

All students at The School for Deacons must complete four semesters of field education with a minimum number of 120 hours per semester (or 8 hours per week), and four semesters of Field Education Seminar. While field placement may be at either an agency or parish, two semesters of parish work are usual. Some students may participate in cultural intensive programs in Latin America that can comprise some or all of Field Education I & II. (Some dioceses have their own expectations for placement and learning goals. The School endeavors to cooperate fully with them.) All placements must be approved by the Coordinator and a contract must be completed by the student and mentor before the semester begins. Field education may be taken during the second and third years of the program, or during the summer months with the consent of the Dean. All students beginning field education must attend an orientation to field education. Students must complete canonically required training in adult sexual abuse prevention,“Safe-guarding our Children,”and Anti-racism training before beginning field education. 4.0 Credits
All students at The School for Deacons must complete four semesters of field education with a minimum number of 120 hours per semester (or 8 hours per week), and four semesters of Field Education Seminar. While field placement may be at either an agency or parish, two semesters of parish work are usual. Some students may participate in cultural intensive programs in Latin America that can comprise some or all of Field Education I & II. (Some dioceses have their own expectations for placement and learning goals. The School endeavors to cooperate fully with them.) All placements must be approved by the Coordinator and a contract must be completed by the student and mentor before the semester begins. Field education may be taken during the second and third years of the program, or during the summer months with the consent of the Dean. All students beginning field education must attend an orientation to field education. Students must complete canonically required training in adult sexual abuse prevention,“Safe-guarding our Children,”and Anti-racism training before beginning field education. 4.0 Credits
All students at The School for Deacons must complete four semesters of field education with a minimum number of 120 hours per semester (or 8 hours per week), and four semesters of Field Education Seminar. While field placement may be at either an agency or parish, two semesters of parish work are usual. Some students may participate in cultural intensive programs in Latin America that can comprise some or all of Field Education I & II. (Some dioceses have their own expectations for placement and learning goals. The School endeavors to cooperate fully with them.) All placements must be approved by the Coordinator and a contract must be completed by the student and mentor before the semester begins. Field education may be taken during the second and third years of the program, or during the summer months with the consent of the Dean. All students beginning field education must attend an orientation to field education. Students must complete canonically required training in adult sexual abuse prevention,“Safe-guarding our Children,”and Anti-racism training before beginning field education. 4.0 Credits
All students at The School for Deacons must complete four semesters of field education with a minimum number of 120 hours per semester (or 8 hours per week), and four semesters of Field Education Seminar. While field placement may be at either an agency or parish, two semesters of parish work are usual. Some students may participate in cultural intensive programs in Latin America that can comprise some or all of Field Education I & II. (Some dioceses have their own expectations for placement and learning goals. The School endeavors to cooperate fully with them.) All placements must be approved by the Coordinator and a contract must be completed by the student and mentor before the semester begins. Field education may be taken during the second and third years of the program, or during the summer months with the consent of the Dean. All students beginning field education must attend an orientation to field education. Students must complete canonically required training in adult sexual abuse prevention, “Safe-guarding our Children,” and Anti-racism training before beginning field education. 4.0 Credits
This seminar runs concurrently with off campus field education placement that begins in the second year of study. The focus is on presentations and discussion about particular ministry experiences, using a theological reflection process as the format. In the first year, students must take Introduction to Theological Reflection as a prerequisite to the seminar. Students may not enroll in Field Education Seminar until and unless a signed learning contract is on file. 1.0 credit
This seminar runs concurrently with off campus field education placement that begins in the second year of study. The focus is on presentations and discussion about particular ministry experiences, using a theological reflection process as the format. In the first year, students must take Introduction to Theological Reflection as a prerequisite to the seminar. Students may not enroll in Field Education Seminar until and unless a signed learning contract is on file. 1.0 credit
This seminar runs concurrently with off campus field education placement that begins in the second year of study. The focus is on presentations and discussion about particular ministry experiences, using a theological reflection process as the format. In the first year, students must take Introduction to Theological Reflection as a prerequisite to the seminar. Students may not enroll in Field Education Seminar until and unless a signed learning contract is on file. 1.0 credit
This seminar runs concurrently with off campus field education placement that begins in the second year of study. The focus is on presentations and discussion about particular ministry experiences, using a theological reflection process as the format. In the first year, students must take Introduction to Theological Reflection as a prerequisite to the seminar. Students may not enroll in Field Education Seminar until and unless a signed learning contract is on file. 1.0 credit

Theology

This is a seminar class exploring the fundamentals of Christian theological inquiry from and Anglican perspective with the goal of developing a distinctive diaconal theology. 2.0 Credits
This course provides a simple grounding in basic Christian theology and then creates an opportunity for the student to develop the discipline of theological reflection. Modes of theological reflection provide a process that involves examining the specific ministerial experiences of the student in the light of scripture, reason and tradition, and self-awareness. 1.5 credits

Homiletics

This year-long course teaches the student the exegetical, organizational, mechanical, and voice projection skills needed in the preparation of sermons. The major emphasis of both semesters is on the practice of delivering distinctly diaconal homilies and sermons. We also build a safe community in which to practice preaching and receive constructive feedback. 1.5 credits
This year-long course teaches the student the exegetical, organizational, mechanical, and voice projection skills needed in the preparation of sermons. The major emphasis of both semesters is on the practice of delivering distinctly diaconal homilies and sermons. We also build a safe community in which to practice preaching and receive constructive feedback. 1.5 credits

Social Ministries

This course introduces students to varieties of social ministry. Students begin to gather information and resources that will be expanded in Social Ministry I & II, and explore their options for Field Education placement in the second year. 1.0 credit
The course lays the foundation for the year-long course in Leadership in Social Ministry. Students cover the basics of social ministry, study the prophetic role and voice of the deacon, and encounter theory and tools for the process of instigating and managing change in organizations—including the church. Students develop and appreciation for the systemic nature of the needs, concerns, and hopes of the world. 1.0 credit
This year-long course is designed for both lay and ordained persons interested in social ministry. Topics in Leadership in Social Ministry I include principles of social ministry, community analysis and assessment, cultural issues, working with volunteers, group dynamics, leadership, and fund raising issues. In Leadership in Social Ministry II, specific social ministries will be examined in depth from programs to feed and house the poor to programs that care for the sick and differently abled. 2.0 Credits
This year-long course is designed for both lay and ordained persons interested in social ministry. Topics in Leadership in Social Ministry I include principles of social ministry, community analysis and assessment, cultural issues, working with volunteers, group dynamics, leadership, and fund raising issues. In Leadership in Social Ministry II, specific social ministries will be examined in depth from programs to feed and house the poor to programs that care for the sick and differently abled. 2.0 Credits

Spiritual Formation

An annual event usually held the first weekend in January (Friday evening through Sunday noon). This is a required event for all full-time students. Content, process, and leadership change yearly. Spouses/partners are welcome to attend and participate. There are a limited number of spaces for alumni, faculty, staff, and board members. 0.5 credits
An annual event usually held the first weekend in January (Friday evening through Sunday noon). This is a required event for all full-time students. Content, process, and leadership change yearly. Spouses/partners are welcome to attend and participate. There are a limited number of spaces for alumni, faculty, staff, and board members. 0.5 credits
An annual event usually held the first weekend in January (Friday evening through Sunday noon). This is a required event for all full-time students. Content, process, and leadership change yearly. Spouses/partners are welcome to attend and participate. There are a limited number of spaces for alumni, faculty, staff, and board members. 0.5 credits
This course is designed by the dean and faculty to be an integrative “capstone” learning experience for third year students. It occurs in the spring semester of the last year and focuses on and reviews the doctrine, discipline, and worship of The Episcopal Church and practical issues in the life, work, and ministry of the deacon. 1.5 Credits
Students are required to meet in spiritual formation groups, away from campus and between school weekends, at least once a month or for a minimum of 16 hours per semester. These groups discuss individual members’ experience with God, the experience of being called as diaconal leaders in the church for the world, and the personal impact of being in an “ordination process.” 1.5 Credits
Students are required to meet in spiritual formation groups, away from campus and between school weekends, at least once a month or for a minimum of 16 hours per semester. These groups discuss individual members’ experience with God, the experience of being called as diaconal leaders in the church for the world, and the personal impact of being in an “ordination process.” 1.5 Credits
Students are required to meet in spiritual formation groups, away from campus and between school weekends, at least once a month or for a minimum of 16 hours per semester. These groups discuss individual members’ experience with God, the experience of being called as diaconal leaders in the church for the world, and the personal impact of being in an “ordination process.” 1.5 Credits
Students are required to meet in spiritual formation groups, away from campus and between school weekends, at least once a month or for a minimum of 16 hours per semester. These groups discuss individual members’ experience with God, the experience of being called as diaconal leaders in the church for the world, and the personal impact of being in an “ordination process.” 1.5 credits
Students are required to meet in spiritual formation groups, away from campus and between school weekends, at least once a month or for a minimum of 16 hours per semester. These groups discuss individual members’ experience with God, the experience of being called as diaconal leaders in the church for the world, and the personal impact of being in an “ordination process.” 1.5 Credits
Students are required to meet in spiritual formation groups, away from campus and between school weekends, at least once a month or for a minimum of 16 hours per semester. These groups discuss individual members’ experience with God, the experience of being called as diaconal leaders in the church for the world, and the personal impact of being in an “ordination process.” 1.5 Credits

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